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  #51  
Old 11-04-2017, 10:34 PM
Rusty Accord Rusty Accord is offline
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Re: Million mile club

Originally Posted by datechboss101 View Post
Okay, I made the connectors snug and tightened them tightly after redoing all the connections (wiring using proper steps).

Now, the next step is to remove the entire interior of the car, as I tend to have an OCD of keeping the cars clean... what are the "torque" specs on the front seats? Also, I don't have the typical torque wrench, as I have a very basic raquet, so how much turns do I need to tighten the bolts of factory specs after I clean the car?
Front seat brackets to floor are 25 ft lbs. Brackets to actual seat bottom are 35 ft lbs. I got these numbers from the "paper" version of the FSM. You might want to download the digital version and burn a CD or 2.

Going back to some of your earlier posts, I'd say your front end problems are more likely tie rod ends, and or ball joints. Probably both. I only say that as you mentioned back on page 2, that your steering wheel was off (from center) and that comes from tie rods and it can also come from ball joints. Hub bearings don't cause this problem unless they've run dry and ground up the bearings themselves. Usually you'll hear a hub bearing. Although tire noise can be similar, you have decide which it is. In my case the noise I was hearing was there with my summer tires (not showing any wear), and also with my winter tires. Once I had the hubs off, along with 1/2 the inner bearing, I could see rust mixed into the grease and I knew the bearings were shot. These were original bearings to the car, in that they were made in Japan (as was my car). They were also NTN bearings (Timken in the USA, as that's what I replaced them with NTN bearings in Timken made in USA boxes).
For your car, I'd get on e-bay, and search for upper control arms, then look for Detroit Axle. Go into their store, and look for a package deal. In my case I found Upper control arms (with new bushings and upper ball joints), lower ball joints, and tie rod ends (outer), along with sway bar end links. I think I paid 103 bucks for all of those parts, and they have a 10 year warranty. The hub bearings I bought thru Rock auto for 50 a pair. While you might think this is a lot, it's actually cheap when you spread it out over miles and years. Plus it replaces everything but the lower control arm and it's 2 bushings. It really fixed my own car, as I just put all of those parts in last month, along with rotors and pads. They were OE parts too, as the lower ball joints didn't have a snap ring, or even a groove for a snap ring (how you tell they are OE). If you go to the Members Rides section, you'll see a couple pics I posted of going thru with that job, along with some of the tools I used. You will need a couple of special tools to do the job. A 1/2" drive breaker bar is definitely #1 on the list. No ands, ifs, or buts about it. In my case I used it along with my 1/2" drive ratchet, and 1/2" drive impact wrench (Ingersol Rand), along with 10,12,14,17, 18, 19, 21, and 36mm sockets (some in 1/4 and 3/8ths drive too), along with some wrenches.

And as far as I'm concerned, if you think buying tools is expensive, by all means pay the labor for someone else to do the job. I'll tell you right now I know a guy who would done the hub bearings, lower ball joints job on my Accord for an easy 400 US. Add in the upper control arms and tie rod ends, he would have added another 250 as you have to remove the struts to access the control arm bolts (again labor charges). So the way I look at, sure I burned 2 afternoons on it, but I saved 650 in labor too. If you ever have to change a timing belt set on an F23, plan on a grand at the dealer (that's what they quoted my wife for her 2000 Accord). It took me 5 hours to do it, and that included the water pump (main reason I was in there), plus a 120 water pump/timing belt kit from Rock Auto with shipping.There are 2 belts involved in this job, and I highly recommend adding the balance shaft retainer clip (5 bucks at Rock Auto) to it while you have the timing cover off. I only say that, as if that seal pops out, it'll dump ALL of the oil in a heart beat. It happened to my wife in the driveway, and 3 quarts in 30 feet was the result. :O I've since added that clip to all of my Accords since that happened.
Something to keep in mind since you have an F23 with AT, you'll eventually need to clean the EGR port. It might be years before it needs to be done, but it will eventually need to be done. That's a 400 dollar job (labor only) at the dealer plus the cost of the valve and the plenum gasket. This is about a 4 hour job, in that you remove the top of the plenum so you can access the plugged port. Yes, I've done that on my wife's car before (at 226K). Total cost for me doing the job was 120 bucks including the valve (100 bucks at the Zone) and gasket (10 bucks plus shipping thru Rock Auto).

I'm only mentioning these things, as they can keep you from getting the life out of your car. But, also 2 or 300 bucks worth of tools can save you thousands of dollars. But, don't just look at what what Harbor Freight offers, as most of their tools are almost 1 shot only. Look at Lowes, and get some Kobalt tools (cheaper version of Snap On). Go to Ace Hardware for Craftsman. Home Depot for Husky, there are decent to good tools out there. Even if you have to rent a tool sometimes having it will make the job go easier and quicker. In my case, I originally rented the Honda lower pulley tool, but I then used it 2 more times, and decided to keep it. Sure it's 50 bucks, but I've used it 3 or 4 times since then, and I'll be using it again once we build my son's Civic engine, as part of it is at the machinist right now, as it spun a bearing 2 months ago.

You can take the advice, or leave it, but even my son understands the need for tools and saving money, especially since shop labor is around 65 to 85 an hour (around here).
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Bob 1997 Accord LX sedan w/ 5 speed F22b2 235K miles currently for sale
1999 Accord LX sedan w/ 5speed F23A1 LEV 232K miles
Sue's 2000 Accord LX sedan AT F23A1 LEV 235K miles
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  #52  
Old 11-05-2017, 10:59 AM
datechboss101 datechboss101 is offline
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Re: Million mile club

Originally Posted by Rusty Accord View Post
Front seat brackets to floor are 25 ft lbs. Brackets to actual seat bottom are 35 ft lbs. I got these numbers from the "paper" version of the FSM. You might want to download the digital version and burn a CD or 2.

Going back to some of your earlier posts, I'd say your front end problems are more likely tie rod ends, and or ball joints. Probably both. I only say that as you mentioned back on page 2, that your steering wheel was off (from center) and that comes from tie rods and it can also come from ball joints. Hub bearings don't cause this problem unless they've run dry and ground up the bearings themselves. Usually you'll hear a hub bearing. Although tire noise can be similar, you have decide which it is. In my case the noise I was hearing was there with my summer tires (not showing any wear), and also with my winter tires. Once I had the hubs off, along with 1/2 the inner bearing, I could see rust mixed into the grease and I knew the bearings were shot. These were original bearings to the car, in that they were made in Japan (as was my car). They were also NTN bearings (Timken in the USA, as that's what I replaced them with NTN bearings in Timken made in USA boxes).
For your car, I'd get on e-bay, and search for upper control arms, then look for Detroit Axle. Go into their store, and look for a package deal. In my case I found Upper control arms (with new bushings and upper ball joints), lower ball joints, and tie rod ends (outer), along with sway bar end links. I think I paid 103 bucks for all of those parts, and they have a 10 year warranty. The hub bearings I bought thru Rock auto for 50 a pair. While you might think this is a lot, it's actually cheap when you spread it out over miles and years. Plus it replaces everything but the lower control arm and it's 2 bushings. It really fixed my own car, as I just put all of those parts in last month, along with rotors and pads. They were OE parts too, as the lower ball joints didn't have a snap ring, or even a groove for a snap ring (how you tell they are OE). If you go to the Members Rides section, you'll see a couple pics I posted of going thru with that job, along with some of the tools I used. You will need a couple of special tools to do the job. A 1/2" drive breaker bar is definitely #1 on the list. No ands, ifs, or buts about it. In my case I used it along with my 1/2" drive ratchet, and 1/2" drive impact wrench (Ingersol Rand), along with 10,12,14,17, 18, 19, 21, and 36mm sockets (some in 1/4 and 3/8ths drive too), along with some wrenches.

And as far as I'm concerned, if you think buying tools is expensive, by all means pay the labor for someone else to do the job. I'll tell you right now I know a guy who would done the hub bearings, lower ball joints job on my Accord for an easy 400 US. Add in the upper control arms and tie rod ends, he would have added another 250 as you have to remove the struts to access the control arm bolts (again labor charges). So the way I look at, sure I burned 2 afternoons on it, but I saved 650 in labor too. If you ever have to change a timing belt set on an F23, plan on a grand at the dealer (that's what they quoted my wife for her 2000 Accord). It took me 5 hours to do it, and that included the water pump (main reason I was in there), plus a 120 water pump/timing belt kit from Rock Auto with shipping.There are 2 belts involved in this job, and I highly recommend adding the balance shaft retainer clip (5 bucks at Rock Auto) to it while you have the timing cover off. I only say that, as if that seal pops out, it'll dump ALL of the oil in a heart beat. It happened to my wife in the driveway, and 3 quarts in 30 feet was the result. :O I've since added that clip to all of my Accords since that happened.
Something to keep in mind since you have an F23 with AT, you'll eventually need to clean the EGR port. It might be years before it needs to be done, but it will eventually need to be done. That's a 400 dollar job (labor only) at the dealer plus the cost of the valve and the plenum gasket. This is about a 4 hour job, in that you remove the top of the plenum so you can access the plugged port. Yes, I've done that on my wife's car before (at 226K). Total cost for me doing the job was 120 bucks including the valve (100 bucks at the Zone) and gasket (10 bucks plus shipping thru Rock Auto).

I'm only mentioning these things, as they can keep you from getting the life out of your car. But, also 2 or 300 bucks worth of tools can save you thousands of dollars. But, don't just look at what what Harbor Freight offers, as most of their tools are almost 1 shot only. Look at Lowes, and get some Kobalt tools (cheaper version of Snap On). Go to Ace Hardware for Craftsman. Home Depot for Husky, there are decent to good tools out there. Even if you have to rent a tool sometimes having it will make the job go easier and quicker. In my case, I originally rented the Honda lower pulley tool, but I then used it 2 more times, and decided to keep it. Sure it's 50 bucks, but I've used it 3 or 4 times since then, and I'll be using it again once we build my son's Civic engine, as part of it is at the machinist right now, as it spun a bearing 2 months ago.

You can take the advice, or leave it, but even my son understands the need for tools and saving money, especially since shop labor is around 65 to 85 an hour (around here).
Dealer charged us ~$819 for the timing belt because I got a sketchy SA who also ironically drives a 6GA (and screwed us over with the CV axle and high priced wheel bearings), while a different SA quoted us $795. I did the sparks myself, as dealer price was literally stupid insane. I really do understand the need for tools, and I am actually on the hunt of getting them. My parents are slowly buying the tools for me, as I don't have a job yet and going to uni in a few months. Just last month, my mom bought the 6mm-14mm set sockets for me, and this past June dad bought me a raquet, 6in extension, 3/8" deep socket. Next item is actually jacks and jack stands and probably tire rod as dealer or costco made the lug nuts very tight, as I have no clue how to properly use the scissor jacks, unless anyone would kindly explain to me how to use the scissor jack properly without scratching the paint of the car.

Also, my parents are the ones saying that we should have a mechanic to do the job; whereas, I counter back saying that the car is easy to repair compared to the newer cars in the garage. But then at the end, it isn't me that makes the money, its my dad. I try my best to get the best deal possible on the tools, as the tools I got were from Wal-Mart. I will give Lowes' a check as they are very close to my place.

Again, not to be mean or anything, my raquet doesn't have torque numbers on it, so that's where I am confused on how much to tight it to spec. EGR, I may look through the forum and see how to clean that, as I got two other cars I can drive while this one is under repair on my brick-paved driveway. I may post how much the dealer charged us for each repair we did this year-to-date.
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  #53  
Old 11-05-2017, 08:34 PM
Rusty Accord Rusty Accord is offline
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Re: Million mile club

Originally Posted by datechboss101 View Post
Again, not to be mean or anything, my raquet doesn't have torque numbers on it, so that's where I am confused on how much to tight it to spec. EGR, I may look through the forum and see how to clean that, as I got two other cars I can drive while this one is under repair on my brick-paved driveway. I may post how much the dealer charged us for each repair we did this year-to-date.
Well, since you removed those bolts with that same ratchet, you have an idea of how tight to make them. About how long is your ratchet? 6 inches? 8 inches? 10 inches? Remember, not all ratchets are the same length. I'm only asking, as the length of the ratchet will determine how much force you'll need to apply to it, to reach a certain torque (physics classes used here, along with some trig). And you never thought you'd use those advanced math classes in real life. See that's the thing, you use rotation force to either torque up a bolt, or to un-torque it. The numbers are supplied by the engineer who designed the parts, and ran the numbers to decide what the spec should be.
But for the most part, you want to get it as tight as you possibly can, but without snapping the bolt. Sometimes I'll use a rubber hammer to break a bolt loose, but then I'm in the "salt belt", where everything rusts (even plastic).

I'm sorry if I keep harping on it, but you really should download the FSM from the Accord Tech section, as it'll help you out more in the long run (more that you can believe) if you plan on keeping this car. It'll help get you familiar with any repair that's needed, plus it gives you trouble shooting steps and ideas (tips), plus it also give directions for removing parts (in a sequence), along with putting everything back together (again in a sequence). To buy it in a paper version (like I have) is 70 bucks. I've gotten my money back out of it already in just doing a handful of jobs on mine and my wife's cars (I have a 99 sedan, and she has a 2000 sedan, and both are covered in the book). I also have one for my 97 Accord (5th gen), and it has a few greasy pages in it too. A Haynes manual is ok, but the FSM is so much more detailed in what it covers (everything about the car). The dealerships probably use the electronic version, as nobody remembers anything about a 15+ year old car (last 6th gen was produced in 2002). Just some thoughts for you to think about.
I hope this helps.
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Bob 1997 Accord LX sedan w/ 5 speed F22b2 235K miles currently for sale
1999 Accord LX sedan w/ 5speed F23A1 LEV 232K miles
Sue's 2000 Accord LX sedan AT F23A1 LEV 235K miles
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  #54  
Old 11-06-2017, 07:09 PM
datechboss101 datechboss101 is offline
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Re: Million mile club

Originally Posted by Rusty Accord View Post
Well, since you removed those bolts with that same ratchet, you have an idea of how tight to make them. About how long is your ratchet? 6 inches? 8 inches? 10 inches? Remember, not all ratchets are the same length. I'm only asking, as the length of the ratchet will determine how much force you'll need to apply to it, to reach a certain torque (physics classes used here, along with some trig). And you never thought you'd use those advanced math classes in real life. See that's the thing, you use rotation force to either torque up a bolt, or to un-torque it. The numbers are supplied by the engineer who designed the parts, and ran the numbers to decide what the spec should be.
But for the most part, you want to get it as tight as you possibly can, but without snapping the bolt. Sometimes I'll use a rubber hammer to break a bolt loose, but then I'm in the "salt belt", where everything rusts (even plastic).

I'm sorry if I keep harping on it, but you really should download the FSM from the Accord Tech section, as it'll help you out more in the long run (more that you can believe) if you plan on keeping this car. It'll help get you familiar with any repair that's needed, plus it gives you trouble shooting steps and ideas (tips), plus it also give directions for removing parts (in a sequence), along with putting everything back together (again in a sequence). To buy it in a paper version (like I have) is 70 bucks. I've gotten my money back out of it already in just doing a handful of jobs on mine and my wife's cars (I have a 99 sedan, and she has a 2000 sedan, and both are covered in the book). I also have one for my 97 Accord (5th gen), and it has a few greasy pages in it too. A Haynes manual is ok, but the FSM is so much more detailed in what it covers (everything about the car). The dealerships probably use the electronic version, as nobody remembers anything about a 15+ year old car (last 6th gen was produced in 2002). Just some thoughts for you to think about.
I hope this helps.
Haven't got the time to check how long the raquet is, but it should be around there though. I am taking Physics and Calc right now, so I know how important they are in the world. Apparently, the quotes I am getting from multiple places (3-4 Honda dealers and few indie mechs) are giving me around $1000, but the Honda dealers are fighting to get my business with them, by going lower than what the dealer that I usually go to. And when I called the dealer I usually go to, the SA that I really dislike, tried to give me some BS reasons why they go with NAPA and was telling me something about this old-new inventory thing...

Also I have the FSM, and on Section 21 page 21, the manual just becomes vague to find the location of the Recirculation Control Module Motor.
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  #55  
Old 11-07-2017, 10:56 AM
Connie Connie is offline
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Re: Million mile club

Please, it's "ratchet". Raquets are for tennis.
You can get an old school analog torque wrench (not the click-type) for like $20.

https://www.ebay.ca/itm/Beam-Torque-...MAAOSw9eVXUIR1
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2000 Accord V6 Coupe, "Midnight", 207,000km
2000 Accord V6 Coupe, 412,000km; 1998 Accord V6 Coupe, 266,000km; 1998 Accord V6 Sedan, 278,000km
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  #56  
Old 11-07-2017, 12:38 PM
Connie Connie is offline
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Re: Million mile club

Originally Posted by datechboss101 View Post
I have no clue how to properly use the scissor jacks, unless anyone would kindly explain to me how to use the scissor jack properly without scratching the paint of the car.
It says how to use the scissor jack in the owner's manual.

If you look under the car, right behind the front wheel underneath the fender, there is a piece of metal about 1/4" thick and about 6" long that points straight down; this one is for lifting the front wheels. That piece of metal fits into the groove in the top of the scissor jack. The same piece can be found in the same location in front of the rear wheels, for lifting the rear wheels.

So slide that piece into the groove, and crank the jack by hand until it starts lifting the car. Then grab the crank rod and slide it into the hole on the piece you were just cranking by hand, and crank with the rod until the wheel is off the ground.

That jack is pretty much just for changing flat tires; under no circumstance should you ever be under a car supported by a scissor jack only. Also apply the emergency brake and block the wheels before you start jacking. The last thing you want is for the car to fall off of the jack.

Something I was taught long ago about working on cars was the "shake test". Once you have a car on stands and plan to do some work underneath it, you need to make sure it's safe before you get under there. So roll a window down and grab the doorframe, and try AS HARD AS YOU CAN to shake the car off the stands. If it moves AT ALL, reposition your jacks and try again. If it falls off of the stands during the shake test, you still win because you didn't die or sustain life-changing injuries.

I've been under probably hundreds of cars by now, and haven't had one fall of during a shake test yet.
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2002 Accord V6 Coupe, "Connie", 504,000km
2000 Accord V6 Coupe, "Midnight", 207,000km
2000 Accord V6 Coupe, 412,000km; 1998 Accord V6 Coupe, 266,000km; 1998 Accord V6 Sedan, 278,000km
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  #57  
Old 11-07-2017, 10:21 PM
Rusty Accord Rusty Accord is offline
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Re: Million mile club

Originally Posted by datechboss101 View Post
Apparently, the quotes I am getting from multiple places (3-4 Honda dealers and few indie mechs) are giving me around $1000, but the Honda dealers are fighting to get my business with them, by going lower than what the dealer that I usually go to. And when I called the dealer I usually go to, the SA that I really dislike, tried to give me some BS reasons why they go with NAPA and was telling me something about this old-new inventory thing...
Wow, a grand for 2 hub bearings and 2 drive axles and labor?? Are they holding a gun to your head? Just asking as that's criminal. The hub bearings are 50 a pair, and can be as high as 50 each for NTN/Timken, just like the factory used. Add 4 hours of labor to that @ 65-85 per hour, and you're still under 500. Yes, genuine Honda drive axles are about 350 each, so they must be getting a cheaper part, or are discounting them (or are only replacing 1). Good reman or even new axles can be had for around 100 each.

Personally, I'd replace the side that has the split boot, as that 1 WILL be the one that will fail. Next I'd replace both outer tie rod ends, and move the rear tires to the front, and see if that takes care of the real problem (why you can't drive above 60 with out shaking the front end). It's possible you have a tire out of balance, that is causing the vibration. It's also possible that a belt could have "slipped", again causing a vibration. Hence why you want to move the rears to the front.

Connie, I let the "raquet" slide, as some people can't seem to spell well, or are letting "spell check" fix it for them (some phones have it, and some don't). Not to mention I know a guy on another forum who goes out of his way to spell words via "phonics". When he posts, you have to read it several times to understand what he's trying to say (he's a mechanic, not an english teacher).

Ninja edit: You might actually be better off taking it to an independent shop, and having a mechanic take it for a ride. The same could be said about taking it to a Honda dealer, and having them take it for a ride. The idea behind it being maybe someone will offer an ideaof what's really wrong with it, and what NEEDS to be repaired.
__________________
Bob 1997 Accord LX sedan w/ 5 speed F22b2 235K miles currently for sale
1999 Accord LX sedan w/ 5speed F23A1 LEV 232K miles
Sue's 2000 Accord LX sedan AT F23A1 LEV 235K miles

Last edited by Rusty Accord; 11-07-2017 at 10:51 PM. Reason: Added some stuff.
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  #58  
Old 11-07-2017, 10:45 PM
Rusty Accord Rusty Accord is offline
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Re: Million mile club

Originally Posted by Enne View Post
I replaced the wheel hub assemblies on my Cavalier, which is FWD. You can just buy the entire assembly for it. I assumed the Accord would be the same, but I guess it is not. And yeah, I know the video is of a different car, but it says "the process will be very similar for replacing any wheel bearing hub assembly with an axle running through it" in the description.

I was not aware it would be different for the Accord. I haven't had wheel bearing issues with mine so I've never looked into the replacement process.
Sorry to bring this up from page 4, but I felt it was important.
Yeah, the hub bearings on a Cavalier are "bolt on" versus press in. I know, because a friend of mine had a Sunbird that got a new right hub bearing every 6 months, because it was shot. Of course that always got a Zone part because it was cheaper than everyone else, and they had it in stock. Gotta love cheap Chinese parts.

The Accord is also not the only car that uses press in hub bearings, Civics, Toyota Corollas, and several other cars use press in hub bearings.

But, I will say this, even with a completely worn out, as in it spit out or ground up all of the bearings, the tire will not "fall off". It might feel like it, but it won't. Even if the big nut fell off, the tire won't just fall off. Now if all 4 (or 5) lug nuts come off, then the tire will fall off.
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Bob 1997 Accord LX sedan w/ 5 speed F22b2 235K miles currently for sale
1999 Accord LX sedan w/ 5speed F23A1 LEV 232K miles
Sue's 2000 Accord LX sedan AT F23A1 LEV 235K miles
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  #59  
Old 11-08-2017, 08:04 AM
datechboss101 datechboss101 is offline
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Re: Million mile club

Originally Posted by Rusty Accord View Post
Wow, a grand for 2 hub bearings and 2 drive axles and labor?? Are they holding a gun to your head? Just asking as that's criminal. The hub bearings are 50 a pair, and can be as high as 50 each for NTN/Timken, just like the factory used. Add 4 hours of labor to that @ 65-85 per hour, and you're still under 500. Yes, genuine Honda drive axles are about 350 each, so they must be getting a cheaper part, or are discounting them (or are only replacing 1). Good reman or even new axles can be had for around 100 each.

Personally, I'd replace the side that has the split boot, as that 1 WILL be the one that will fail. Next I'd replace both outer tie rod ends, and move the rear tires to the front, and see if that takes care of the real problem (why you can't drive above 60 with out shaking the front end). It's possible you have a tire out of balance, that is causing the vibration. It's also possible that a belt could have "slipped", again causing a vibration. Hence why you want to move the rears to the front.

Connie, I let the "raquet" slide, as some people can't seem to spell well, or are letting "spell check" fix it for them (some phones have it, and some don't). Not to mention I know a guy on another forum who goes out of his way to spell words via "phonics". When he posts, you have to read it several times to understand what he's trying to say (he's a mechanic, not an english teacher).

Ninja edit: You might actually be better off taking it to an independent shop, and having a mechanic take it for a ride. The same could be said about taking it to a Honda dealer, and having them take it for a ride. The idea behind it being maybe someone will offer an ideaof what's really wrong with it, and what NEEDS to be repaired.
The dealer diagnosed the wheel bearings sometime during the summer, and found out its the wheel bearings that are causing the issue. They connected the wheel bearings to a stetiscope (whatever the heck its called) and found the issue. However, they are literally asking us for $2,000 for the freaking repair. I contacted a indie mech that my friends recommended, and he gave the best deal, but however, the bill would be a minimum of $1,000 for the repairs, and dad said he wants me to drive the Rogue as he doesn't want to pay $1000+ for wheel bearings and new cv axle. If the latter is going to happen, I need to do a CVT 3x D&F, but will be in the accord community, as I do have plans to get rid of the Rogue after I am done with Undergrad school, and may end up getting a Honda Accord or an Acura.

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Lucky- 1999 Honda Accord LX 2.3L 4AT SSM- 113k miles
Pato- 2016 Nissan Rogue SL 2.5L CVT ABM- 45k miles
Lelu 2.0- 2017 Acura MDX Tech 3.5L 9AT BCP- 3k miles
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Old 11-08-2017, 03:44 PM
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Re: Million mile club

Originally Posted by Rusty Accord View Post
Sorry to bring this up from page 4, but I felt it was important.
Yeah, the hub bearings on a Cavalier are "bolt on" versus press in. I know, because a friend of mine had a Sunbird that got a new right hub bearing every 6 months, because it was shot. Of course that always got a Zone part because it was cheaper than everyone else, and they had it in stock. Gotta love cheap Chinese parts.

The Accord is also not the only car that uses press in hub bearings, Civics, Toyota Corollas, and several other cars use press in hub bearings.

But, I will say this, even with a completely worn out, as in it spit out or ground up all of the bearings, the tire will not "fall off". It might feel like it, but it won't. Even if the big nut fell off, the tire won't just fall off. Now if all 4 (or 5) lug nuts come off, then the tire will fall off.
I'll speak on the contrary. A good friend of mine had one of his front bearings seize up on the highway at 80mph and the complete front hub assembly broke off the truck. Lost all brake pressure and the only thing that slowed him to a stop was the lower control arm and frame dragging on the pavement
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