Fogger vs. Direct port

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98AccrdSdn

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I have seen dozens of NOS fogger and direct port systems on Ebay. Which would be the better route?
 

retroshark

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it depends how hardcore your getting into nitrous. In my oppinion, nitrous isnt such a great idea... but if you gonan do it, do a dry kit, not a direct port. a direct port is complicated and could mess up your motor. and with the ammount of n20 youd be shooting, it wouldnt need a direct port kit.
 

98AccrdSdn

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Once my engine is done. I was told I'll be able to withstand 25lbs of boost and 100 shot of NOS.
 

Wildman

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retroshark said:
it depends how hardcore your getting into nitrous. In my oppinion, nitrous isnt such a great idea... but if you gonan do it, do a dry kit, not a direct port. a direct port is complicated and could mess up your motor. and with the ammount of n20 youd be shooting, it wouldnt need a direct port kit.

Actually a dry kit is usually the worst kind of kit you can run, because it only injects nitrous into your intake and leaves it up to your car to detect the extra air & compensate for more fuel. Wet kits inject fuel + nitrous at the same time, helping to prevent detonation. Dry kits are only really good on cars that have intake manifolds that are notorious for fuel puddling, where the person doesn't want to fork out the extra cash for a direct port.

Direct port is definitely the best way you could go. It's basically a more sophisticated fogger kit (what is usually just referred to as a wet kit). In a basic wet setup you inject the fuel + nitrous into your intake. With Direct port - it's just that, directly ported into to each individual cylinder, ensuring the most even distribution of nitrous possible.
 

BlkCurrantKord

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Direct port is the way to go if you wanna go all out. In laymen's terms - its more of a refined wet shot.
 

HandoEX

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retroshark said:
it depends how hardcore your getting into nitrous. In my oppinion, nitrous isnt such a great idea... but if you gonan do it, do a dry kit, not a direct port. a direct port is complicated and could mess up your motor. and with the ammount of n20 youd be shooting, it wouldnt need a direct port kit.
I would like to see this feedback backed up. Why is nitrous not a good idea? Why is a dry kit the way to go? How could a direct port setup "mess up your motor" more than a wet or dry kit?
Not trying to start anything, it just seems that you are inexperienced with nitrous and are not in a position to offer suggestions on the topic.
 

Wildman

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direct port won't "mess up" your motor - it's actually the safest way to go. it's just more of a permanent option, and you can't really just take the nitrous kit off if you want to with a direct port kit.

a dry kit is the cheapest kit - and performs the worst too. the advantages of a dry kit are price, and they are the easiest to install. disadvantages, is they only inject nitrous (and no fuel) so you're increasing the chances of detonation which is bad (basically, fuel inside the cylinder combusts before its supposed to).

wet kit costs a bit more than dry kit, and is a bit more difficult to install. the install isn't really any more complex than with a dry kit, but becuase you are injecting both fuel + nitrous, you have 2 solenoids instead of 1, so you kind of do the same work twice. because wet kits inject fuel + nitrous, they are more reliable because there's a smaller risk of detonation.

those 2 kinds of kits spray into the air intake, a few inches back from the throttle body. the nitrous goes through the throttle body, through the intake manifold, and eventually into the cylinders. some cars have intake manifolds that are inherently bad, and can cause fuel to puddle up in the intake manifold when you are using a wet kit, and in extreme cases the puddled fuel can ignite and blow the intake manifold up. only then would I ever say that a dry kit would be better than a wet kit.

with a direct port kit, you're injecting nitrous + extra fuel DIRECTLY into the cylinder - guaranteeing that every cylinder is doing the same amount of work. with basic wet/dry kits, because the nitrous travels through the intake manifold, it isn't always dispersed equally among all the cylinders. no intake manifold is perfect, so you'll always have more airflow to one cylinder more than the others. that's why direct port kits are the best for long-term engine reliability because all the cylinders do the same amount of work. that becomes more important with a bigger shot, which is why direct port kits are used more often when someone is planning on running a huge shot of nitrous or when they are going to be using nitrous with a turbo setup or something.

hope that helps
 

98AccrdSdn

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Wildman said:
direct port won't "mess up" your motor - it's actually the safest way to go. it's just more of a permanent option, and you can't really just take the nitrous kit off if you want to with a direct port kit.

a dry kit is the cheapest kit - and performs the worst too. the advantages of a dry kit are price, and they are the easiest to install. disadvantages, is they only inject nitrous (and no fuel) so you're increasing the chances of detonation which is bad (basically, fuel inside the cylinder combusts before its supposed to).

wet kit costs a bit more than dry kit, and is a bit more difficult to install. the install isn't really any more complex than with a dry kit, but becuase you are injecting both fuel + nitrous, you have 2 solenoids instead of 1, so you kind of do the same work twice. because wet kits inject fuel + nitrous, they are more reliable because there's a smaller risk of detonation.

those 2 kinds of kits spray into the air intake, a few inches back from the throttle body. the nitrous goes through the throttle body, through the intake manifold, and eventually into the cylinders. some cars have intake manifolds that are inherently bad, and can cause fuel to puddle up in the intake manifold when you are using a wet kit, and in extreme cases the puddled fuel can ignite and blow the intake manifold up. only then would I ever say that a dry kit would be better than a wet kit.

with a direct port kit, you're injecting nitrous + extra fuel DIRECTLY into the cylinder - guaranteeing that every cylinder is doing the same amount of work. with basic wet/dry kits, because the nitrous travels through the intake manifold, it isn't always dispersed equally among all the cylinders. no intake manifold is perfect, so you'll always have more airflow to one cylinder more than the others. that's why direct port kits are the best for long-term engine reliability because all the cylinders do the same amount of work. that becomes more important with a bigger shot, which is why direct port kits are used more often when someone is planning on running a huge shot of nitrous or when they are going to be using nitrous with a turbo setup or something.

hope that helps
In case anyone is interested. You can get an Edelbrock Victor direct port system on Ebay for about $450 maybe a lil bit more. Completely adjustable from 75-125hp.
 
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