Suggestions and general info, please?

Discussion in 'Accord Tech' started by Snyp3r01, Nov 19, 2016.

  1. Snyp3r01

    Snyp3r01 New Member

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    I have an automatic 99 lx coupe which comes with a 2.3L VTEC engine....(160k miles) Or so I've been told. I've actually been told different things by people who supposedly specialized in tuning Hondas and by fuels people at Valvoline. got charged $300 for changing the front O2 sensor, told that to fix my windows would be an additional $300, and a couple of other things. This solid $300 thing has me skeptical of the so called "experts" at Precision Auto Tuning.
    So I'm coming here.

    Look I know virtually nothing about my car other than the top line there and that people love VTECs for some reason.
    Once I get all of my repairs done, id like to do some modding.

    Yes. A hundred people have already told me that a Civic is easier to mod. Well I don't have a Civic. I don't want to trade my accord in any time soon, either.

    I can already tell the kids driving around their daddy's Cummins diesel trucks to **** off, but i wanna be able to take on bigger and badder vehicles. I mean ****, before I got that O2 sensor changed, I got beat by a 2001 Ford Taurus. That was absolutely depressing.

    Also, is the rear end of this car usually really high off the ground or should I get that looked at?
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2016
  2. RedRyder

    RedRyder Be a better driver

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    I promise you it's not that hard to educate yourself and do the simple maintenance things to save some money, like the $300 for changing that front o2 sensor. Between here, YouTube, a Haynes manual, and ericthecarguy's website you can do most anything on these cars. I started out with a 137pc tool kit from Sears and a few other wrenches, and things just grew from there. Every time I attempt something new I always look up the info or watch a video, and decide if I can handle it or not.

    It's not that a Civic is easier to mod, it's just easier to find parts for it. Actually installing parts is the same as anything else, really. The 6GA got some good stuff from a few companies but most of them are either long gone or stopped making stuff. Most of the aftermarket was garbage, unfortunately. There are still some quality aftermarket parts out there though, for example Sullivan Racing Products makes some awesome aluminum pedal covers.

    If your car is automatic, the 5spd swap would instantly improve the performance and fun factor in your car the most, but it's one of the more complicated jobs to take on of course. If you are already manual, the only other way to get a significant performance increase is to build the motor or go F/I.

    Post a photo of your concern with the rear end. I doubt there's an issue there, these cars were pretty high from the factory. If you're not feeling or hearing anything irregular, there is no issue.
     
  3. Varnell

    Varnell Well-Known Member

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    Highballing and saying they replaced both O2 sensors and charged $50 for each, at $60/hr that means it took them over three hours for something that takes a max of 30 minutes to install.
     
  4. kn0x47

    kn0x47 Senior Member

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    front O2 sensor on the 4 banger is a 5 minute job. i did it myself when pepboys wanted $80 just for labor. You need a new mechanic. Sense you don't know much i'd highly recommend always asking 2 shops when you need something done. there's nothing hard about working on these cars especially when you have the 4 cylinder.

    the rear of the car shouldnt sit higher than the front. What's wrong with the windows? Post some photos of the car when you can (i think you have to wait a few days before this site will let you)

    what part of nashville do you live in? I know a few people that live up there and they might be able to recommend a mechanic
     
  5. Varnell

    Varnell Well-Known Member

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    I've swapped out windows, regulators, and motors for these cars more times that I can remember. Pretty simple as long as you have a 10mm extension.

    For noticeable difference a 5spd swap, like Chris mentioned, is a must. A tune up and some Royal Purple will help. Empty the trunk. Gut the interior if you won't mind (makes replacing window parts easier).

    We have pretty small rear bumpers, if that's what you mean. With my frame less than 2" from the ground, the rear bumper would be 8"(from what I remember) off the ground. As long as the front/rear wheel gaps are about the same you should be fine. I'm half expecting to see a pic with coils in the front and oem V6 coupe rear struts in the back.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2016
  6. SupraGuy

    SupraGuy Well-Known Member

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    Part of it depends on what you want the car to do most of the time.

    If you want a race car, you'd better learn to fix it. Racing and paying someone else to do your maintenance work is going to get really pricey really fast. Given that you seem to have done a fair amount of racing already, you'd better invest in a repair manual and a set of tools pretty soon, or else accept the fact that your car isn't going to last you very long. Well, even if you do your own maintenance, chances are that the car isn't going to last all that long.

    Regardless, these cars are over 15 years old now. Regular maintenance is something that they're going to need, no matter what you do. Learning how is going to save you a lot of money.

    For starters, get an OBDII scanner. eBay has Bluetooth ones that are fairly cheap and connect to your phone via Bluetooth, and you can get engine codes via an app like Torque. That will help with diagnostics, and will probably save you money the first time you use it to diagnose a check engine light, as well as give you other performance data.

    Buy a decent socket set. It doesn't have to be Mac or Snap-on, Craftsman will do fine, but don't get the ultra cheap ones. The cost of the cheap set is the cost of the cheap set plus the cost of the good one to replace it, after all. And get a repair manual. A Haynes will likely do the job.

    Try some easy projects to start. Pull the spark plugs and examine them. Inspect the distributor cap and rotor. Pull the wheels and inspect the brake pads. Change the oil. This will help make you more aware of the car's condition, and build confidence that you really CAN do these things yourself if you need to.

    The automatics in these cars hasn't got a good reputation. One of the reasons that you've been hearing to do a 5 speed swap. That's a larger project, and probably not one that I'd say you want to tackle right away, particularly if you can't be without the car for a few weeks. At the very least, you should probably be getting set to do a fluid change in the automatic, particularly if you've been driving hard.

    Good luck, and I hope your car gives you several years of reliable service.
     
  7. phi1542

    phi1542 Well-Known Member

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    I hope you didn't already pay the $300 extremely over priced. But I also agree with everyone else. I recently started to do my own work on my car instead of paying someone to do it and it's not as hard as it sounds. I'm not doing anything complex but things like installing coilovers, taking the intake mani off to clean the egr port, changing cabin air filter, taking apart the center console to swap out the shifter assembly, little things like that. Watch videos or look at DIY write ups. If you think you can handle the job try it out. It is a lot of work sometimes because you will run into problems during the job. That's how it was for me at least haha nothing was ever as simple as the video and something ALWAYS went wrong. Something wont come off, something wont go back on, doesnt fit, doesnt work etc lol you just need the time and some basic tools.
     
  8. Nam1911a1

    Nam1911a1 Well-Known Member

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    I don't know what kinda trucks you have been racing but I know my 2007 tundra 5.7 v8 will eat my Honda 2.3 vtec 5 speed any day.

    If you wanna be fast than ur gonna need money, time, and a turbo setup.
     
  9. barfo

    barfo Member

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    We have three 6th Gen Accords and I try to do as much as I can within my capabilities. I take them to a privately owned Honda shop for some minor and major repairs/maintenance, but I do think they charge too much for things that I can do myself, like change the door lock actuators, cabin air filters, etc., so do your homework and determine if what needs to be fixed is something you can do yourself.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  10. Snyp3r01

    Snyp3r01 New Member

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    I can't take an image of low enough quality to post on this site.
    They charged me for only the front o2 sensor change, not the rear. I thought the price was ridiculous but couldn't say for sure.
    I'll readdress the matter of my rear suspension when I clear out my trunk and back seat. Both are full until I find a new place to stay.
    I'm in the mount Juliet area but looking to move to Antioch/Madison.

    I have now purchased a new 2-ton jack and a Haynes Manual.
    Fluids are definitely taken care of. I had Valvoline exchange the tranny fluid along with putting their full synthetic oil blend in and the radiator is new. Battery is also new.

    New Gold brakes in the front, but an unexplained grinding noise from the front driver's side wheel. Possibly needs new lower ball bearing/tire rod? Having that looked at soon by a local mechanic that I was recommended to by some dude at a local AutoZone.

    Thank you all for all of the suggestions and advice!
    I'll look into the five speed swap but I really don't have the resources to go without work for weeks at a time. Will need an alternative means of transportation and probably the help of a skilled mechanic while working on that.
    I think I've addressed all of the comments. I'll check again later.
     

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