Starting issue

Discussion in 'URGENT - Help Quick!' started by GERM, Apr 23, 2017.

  1. Rusty Accord

    Rusty Accord Well-Known Member

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    Yup, ran into that when I cleaned the EGR passage on my wife's Accord. 230+K miles will do that. That was also the first time I had the upper intake off a Honda. Sure made getting to the stuff close to the firewall easier. ;)
     
  2. GERM

    GERM Well-Known Member

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    Rustyaccord.

    Did you clean the lower part of the intake manifold?
    The one still attached to the head.
    I cleaned the top part and around the bottom half, but not sure how to clean the individual holes on the bottom half. I do not want to get brake cleaner or chunks of carbon down those holes. My idea is to put a a rag at the bottom of each hole then clean as neat as possible.
     
  3. Rusty Accord

    Rusty Accord Well-Known Member

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    Yes. I used blue towels (shop towels on a roll) to plug the openings going to the head, and cleaned the rest of the manifold with carb cleaner, more blue towels, and compressed air. The entire EGR port was plugged on it (from the EGR valve all the way into the manifold). I did however clean everything I could while I was in there, including the IAC from both sides. I wasn't in any hurry either, as I wanted to get the CEL/MIL light off (EGR code). Once it was back together, I topped off the coolant level, and bled the air out (otherwise the IAC won't operate correctly). I did have to let the IAC "relearn", as I had cleared the codes. It's been good for over a year now with no codes present, and a smooth idle.
     
  4. GERM

    GERM Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for your input.
    Im also going to clean as much as safely possible.
    I however did not drain the coolant. Honestly only about an ounce of coolant leaked when I removed the hoses.
     
  5. GERM

    GERM Well-Known Member

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    Been busy, but Finally got it back together.
    Now it's idling like crazy, jumping 800rpms up and down constantly. Time to bleed the radiator(guessing that's the issue).
     
  6. Connie

    Connie Well-Known Member

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    That's what happens when you get air in the cooling system on Hondas lol. My 92 accord did the same thing when it had air pockets; the best place to bleed it is the highest part of the cooling system that you can easily open. On my 92 it was the little hose on the side of the throttle body if I remember correctly. All the air will go to the top so you need to open it for bleeding at the highest place possible for it to be effective.

    Oddly enough, on my 6th gens, it's always seemed to just bleed itself after doing a drain and fill (Id just overfill the overflow tank a bit, drive around and get it nice an hot, let the extra puke out as the system pressurized, and that's it). But my 6g cars are all j30, so obviously a different cooling system than an f23a4 car. I bet the 4-cylinder cars have a nearly identical setup as my old 92 f22b had.
     
  7. GERM

    GERM Well-Known Member

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    -connie

    I used to have a 92 accord ex coupe 5spd and I always regret selling it.

    I've also never had to do bleed any radiator on a Honda before. Drain and fill seemed to have been all I needed to do. A few months back my heater core hose ripped nearby where it connects to the block. Spilled pretty much all my coolant. I just cut and extended the hose then topped my radiator of with water( I was at work) and it drove great.
    Now I removed two hoses from the IACV, spilled an ounce of coolant and my car is possessed.
     
  8. Rusty Accord

    Rusty Accord Well-Known Member

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    Yes, there's a bleeder on the F23 near the "T" stat housing. The other option is to do like you mentioned.
     
  9. Connie

    Connie Well-Known Member

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    I traded an old fridge for my old 92 and then drove it to Mexico for 8 months, then back to Canada where I actually sold it for $500 after I picked up my 6th gen. I was actually offered $20,000 Mexican pesos (about $1400 Canadian at the time) by a Mexican police officer after bribing my way out of a speeding ticket. The officer liked that the paint wasn't peeling off due to 20+ years in the Sonoran desert, and that the air conditioning was working.

    It was completely rotten (like big holes through the floor, door jambs and rear fenders) and automatic. But that thing never let me down. If it wasn't automatic and a lost cause with all that rust, I probably would have kept it.

    If the system is like my old 92: start the car and let it get up to temp. Keep the overflow full. With the car still running, pull off the coolant hose from the throttle body, let it leak coolant for a few seconds, and hook it back up. Repeat until idle goes back to normal. Wear gloves so you don't burn yourself, and have a drip pan underneath to catch what you bleed out.

    I'd use the blue Honda coolant if possible; have had good luck with it over the years.
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2017
  10. GERM

    GERM Well-Known Member

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    -connie.
    Thanks for the info.
     

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